Pride Continues with These Local Stonewall 50 Exhibits

Written by | Lifestyle

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[Photo: Elektra KB (Colombian). Protest Sign II, 2017. Textile, felt, thread, 66 x 34 in. (167.6 x 86.4 cm). Courtesy of the artist. © Elektra KB; Tuesday Smillie (American, born 1981). ]

The Big Apple clearly values the impact its vibrant gay community has had on the ever-changing face of New York. And as the world looked this year to NYC for WorldPride and the 50th Anniversary of Stonewall, some of the city’s finest cultural institutions are continuing to show their support in the form of dedicated exhibitions.

In other words, Pride month may be over in New York City, but a good portion of the world will be observing the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising throughout 2019.

For example, at the Museum of the City of New York, be sure to check out PRIDE: Photographs of Stonewall and Beyond by Fred W. McDarrah. This exhibit has been open since early June and celebrates the work and life of the famed Village Voice photographer. Though not self-identified as LGBTQ, McDarrah chronicled many gay events throughout his long career as an ally, including Pride celebrations. His lens saw plenty of action, including the historic Stonewall Uprising. (mcny.org)

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While Stonewall 50 has many observers looking back at the LGBTQ struggle for equality, 2019 also marked the first year ever that WorldPride has been held in the USA. And with that, celebrants are also living in the present — and looking toward the future.

Or you can head across the East River, where they’re considering Stonewall as a new beginning in Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall at the Brooklyn Museum. This exhibit showcases more than 20 LGBTQ artists born after 1969, which makes this much more of a contemporary exhibit than other shows looking back at Stonewall. Media which includes painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and video chronicle the artists’ place in a world where queer identity has been constantly evolving. Organizers say that exhibit is also meant to explore “interconnected themes of revolt, commemoration, care and desire.” brooklynmuseum.org

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Last modified: August 14, 2019